The Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike Review

Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike, this year’s latest and final expansion set of the Pokémon title, debuted nationally on Friday, November 12.  Three other expansions had been released earlier this year. We are excited to bring you the Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike review.

The Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike Release Date

Fusion Strike is the concluding expansion set of the Sword & Shield run.  Battle Styles kicked off the title March 19; it had been followed by Chilling Reign June 18, and Evolving Skies bowed August 27. Dating back to Pokémon’s inception in 1995, Sword & Shield comprises Generation VIII, which began in 2019.

Fusion Strike CCG Mechanics

The game itself is pretty complicated. There are nuanced variations and rare in-game occurrences that can appear to unfold in a mind-bending manner.  In brief increments, though, Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike may be viewed through a simple prism.

Fusion Strike seems to offer players a key term: Battle Style, apart from its 2021 fraternal expansions.  This component has been a common thread in every Generation of Pokémon gameplay. This one aspect has successfully kept Pokémon fans enthusiastically engaged long after players emerge from their pubescent years.

Fusion Strike builds on existing Fusion Strike CCG Mechanics (get the new release on Amazon)

Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike Review: Contents

Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike contains 264 cards (excluding Rares, Gold, and promo cards), reportedly the most significant expansion of this series to date.  Each card pack contains 10 cards.

A 36-pack Booster box carries a $143.64 MSRP. However, Amazon lists the unit at $124.30, while select eBay vendors have the product for as low as $117.99 plus shipping.

Accessories to Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike include an Elite Trainer Box ($49.03 eBay; $58.95 Amazon), which had also been released November 12.  The Build and Battle Stadium component ($69.82 at Amazon) will launch on November 26.

The Trainer Box

The contents of the Trainer Box are as follows:

  • 8 Pokémon TCG: Sword & Shield—Fusion Strike booster packs.
  • 65 card sleeves featuring Mew
  • 45 Pokémon TCG Energy cards.
  • A Player’s Guide to the Sword & Shield—Fusion Strike expansion
  • Pokémon TCG rulebook
  • 6 damage-counter dice
  • One competition-legal coin-flip die
  • Two acrylic condition markers
  • Collector’s box with four dividers.
  • One code card for the Pokémon Trading Card Game Online.
The Elite Trainer has everything you need to get your battle on (look for one on eBay)

The Build and Battle Stadium Package

The Build and Battle Stadium package includes:

  • 2 individual Build & Battle Boxes
  • 4 Fusion Strike booster packs
  • 121 Pokémon Energy cards
  • 6 damage counter dice
  • One competition-legal coin-flip die
  • 2 acrylic condition markers; and one collector’s box

Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike Review Of Value

Pre-sale speculation about the values of individual Fusion Strike cards is nearly as exciting as engaging in the CCG itself.  Tcgplayer.com is a market and futures analyzer, monitoring vendors’ pricing of collectible card game singles, packs, and related components. As of Friday morning, November 12, a brief survey reveals a relatively broad expanse between the top-valued cards and those listed in the top-10 of Fusion Strike’s most-pursued (expensive) pieces.  Occupying the top-of-the-mountain – for now – is the Gengar VMAX (Alternate secret full-art) at $182.50. Gengar generates a considerable following among game players, and the scarcity of this example drives this card’s early dollar figures.

The five most valuable Fusion Strike game cards check in at $99 or more.  Meanwhile, the cheapest of the Top-10, titled Mew VMAX, stands at a trifle over $38.

eBay activity for other Sword & Shield cards

Below are selected figures of completed sales/auction prices (including Fusion Strike) found on eBay in mid-November.  All are unopened product types.

Battle Styles — Booster Boxes $84.00
Battle Styles — Trainer Boxes $36.00
Chilling Reign — Booster Boxes $99.00
Chilling Reign– Trainer Boxes Ice Rider: $42

Shadow Rider: $32

Evolving Skies – Booster Boxes $110
Evolving Skies–Trainer Boxes

 

$39
Fusion Strike — Booster Boxes $109.99
Fusion Strike — Trainer Boxes

 

$52.75

In terms of monetary worth, the Fusion Strike release seems a solid entry of the Pokémon franchise for its time.  Slabbed/graded examples of singles from each expansion can range anywhere between $10 (for MT-9 examples) to a recent BIN Battle Styles Rapid Strike Urshifu VMAX 170/163 Secret Rare (PSA-10) for $599.00.

Evolving Skies – Booster Boxes have held value well (can you get a good deal on eBay?)

Bottomline Of Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike Review

Consider this:  An Internet report recently stated Wizards of the Coast and parent company Hasbro declared over $800 million in earnings. Meanwhile, the Pokémon Company, co-owned by Nintendo, announced record sales of over $1.1 billion in June with profits of $170 million.  The figures include both the CCG and video game-based income. The popularity of the format has never been in doubt. The Sword & Shield: Fusion Strike is a worthy addition to its cannon.

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